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  #41  
Old 12-02-2013, 05:23 PM
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I have a real problem with people who want to be half residents. People move to a city for economic, for cultural, the weather, family, low taxes - a whole host of reasons. For whatever reason, they chose to live here.

If you live in a city, don't you have an obligation or responsibility to become a citizen of that community? Don't you want to read the newspaper where you live to know what is happening in your world, not the one where you used to live? Don't you want to vote for people on your city council rather than the commission where you used to live? Don't you want to be on the PTA where you kid goes to school instead of the school where you used to live? So why do you want to move to a city, leave your former city, become a citizen of your new town, but still hang on to the sporting teams from the place you used to live?

The worst are the folks who dress their kids up in their former home town's team colors. I'll confess, I did the same thing when I left Chicago. When my kids & I moved to Sarasota my kids were given the finest Bear's, White Sox and Bulls T-Shirts in town. It took me some time, but I realized that I wasn't being fair to my kids. They had the right to be proud of the city where they lived and fit in with their friends who were Tampa fans. I was really being selfish trying to make them live my childhood, cheering for teams from a city that they had no interest in or was ever home. So I stopped being a White Sox fan and became a Rays fan because I wanted my kids to be proud of the city where they lived. I grew up a Blackhawk fan, but when they play the Lightning, they are just another dirt bag team with a bunch of crappy fans that piss me off when they scream during the national anthem.

I don't get it. If your heart is still in Buffalo, shuffle off. Life's too short to live in a place when you truly want to live somewhere else. You can get a job there. You can shovel snow - lots of people do it.

I'm not telling you that you have to abandon your past. If Chicago is in the World Series against a team other than Tampa, I'm probably going to be cheering for Chicago.

But let's put it another way. If someone immigrates to this country and becomes an American citizen do you want them cheering for their former country or the USA? On St. Patrick’s Day, it’s ok to wear green and be proud that you’re Irish. But you damn well better not be rooting for Ireland against the United States in a soccer match.
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  #42  
Old 12-02-2013, 05:54 PM
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Originally Posted by Donnie D View Post
I have a real problem with people who want to be half residents. People move to a city for economic, for cultural, the weather, family, low taxes - a whole host of reasons. For whatever reason, they chose to live here.

If you live in a city, don't you have an obligation or responsibility to become a citizen of that community? Don't you want to read the newspaper where you live to know what is happening in your world, not the one where you used to live? Don't you want to vote for people on your city council rather than the commission where you used to live? Don't you want to be on the PTA where you kid goes to school instead of the school where you used to live? So why do you want to move to a city, leave your former city, become a citizen of your new town, but still hang on to the sporting teams from the place you used to live?

The worst are the folks who dress their kids up in their former home town's team colors. I'll confess, I did the same thing when I left Chicago. When my kids & I moved to Sarasota my kids were given the finest Bear's, White Sox and Bulls T-Shirts in town. It took me some time, but I realized that I wasn't being fair to my kids. They had the right to be proud of the city where they lived and fit in with their friends who were Tampa fans. I was really being selfish trying to make them live my childhood, cheering for teams from a city that they had no interest in or was ever home. So I stopped being a White Sox fan and became a Rays fan because I wanted my kids to be proud of the city where they lived. I grew up a Blackhawk fan, but when they play the Lightning, they are just another dirt bag team with a bunch of crappy fans that piss me off when they scream during the national anthem.

I don't get it. If your heart is still in Buffalo, shuffle off. Life's too short to live in a place when you truly want to live somewhere else. You can get a job there. You can shovel snow - lots of people do it.

I'm not telling you that you have to abandon your past. If Chicago is in the World Series against a team other than Tampa, I'm probably going to be cheering for Chicago.

But let's put it another way. If someone immigrates to this country and becomes an American citizen do you want them cheering for their former country or the USA? On St. Patrickís Day, itís ok to wear green and be proud that youíre Irish. But you damn well better not be rooting for Ireland against the United States in a soccer match.
I somewhat agree with you. I use to think this way, but I'm more open minded now, even though I am somebody who has lived here all of my life and never rooted against my home team. Hell, I'm even a Bulls fan over the other Florida teams. The part about the kids definitely is the worst part.

However, the way that I see it, sports are a business, your cheering for millionaires from all over the world, and the bottom line is still how much money is made. It would be different if all sports teams were permanently attached to a city and couldn't be dissolved, or taking that to the extreme, only residents could participate in the arena. Therefore, although I don't agree with it, I don't judge.

It is VERY much like falling in love, there is no guarantee that the person you are with will stick around. With every strike, stadium proposal, or threat of moving to another city, it makes less sense to attach yourself to a team. How much of an emotional attachment can you create with a team that could move to another city, players that can leave, or owners that can refuse to reinvest money back into the team? How much am I going to cheer on the Bucs, knowing that they bank 100% of the concessions at games, from the local college, even though the community flipped the bill for their stadium?

Granted, its much easier to support and develop an attachment to a team with a guy like Vinik who reinvests into the community, as opposed to the Glazers who've banked 1000% profit after holding the city ransom, but the same rules apply.
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  #43  
Old 12-02-2013, 06:00 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Donnie D View Post
I have a real problem with people who want to be half residents. People move to a city for economic, for cultural, the weather, family, low taxes - a whole host of reasons. For whatever reason, they chose to live here.

If you live in a city, don't you have an obligation or responsibility to become a citizen of that community? Don't you want to read the newspaper where you live to know what is happening in your world, not the one where you used to live? Don't you want to vote for people on your city council rather than the commission where you used to live? Don't you want to be on the PTA where you kid goes to school instead of the school where you used to live? So why do you want to move to a city, leave your former city, become a citizen of your new town, but still hang on to the sporting teams from the place you used to live?

The worst are the folks who dress their kids up in their former home town's team colors. I'll confess, I did the same thing when I left Chicago. When my kids & I moved to Sarasota my kids were given the finest Bear's, White Sox and Bulls T-Shirts in town. It took me some time, but I realized that I wasn't being fair to my kids. They had the right to be proud of the city where they lived and fit in with their friends who were Tampa fans. I was really being selfish trying to make them live my childhood, cheering for teams from a city that they had no interest in or was ever home. So I stopped being a White Sox fan and became a Rays fan because I wanted my kids to be proud of the city where they lived. I grew up a Blackhawk fan, but when they play the Lightning, they are just another dirt bag team with a bunch of crappy fans that piss me off when they scream during the national anthem.

I don't get it. If your heart is still in Buffalo, shuffle off. Life's too short to live in a place when you truly want to live somewhere else. You can get a job there. You can shovel snow - lots of people do it.

I'm not telling you that you have to abandon your past. If Chicago is in the World Series against a team other than Tampa, I'm probably going to be cheering for Chicago.

But let's put it another way. If someone immigrates to this country and becomes an American citizen do you want them cheering for their former country or the USA? On St. Patrickís Day, itís ok to wear green and be proud that youíre Irish. But you damn well better not be rooting for Ireland against the United States in a soccer match.
I also agree to some degree. The Dish and DirecTV brought your home town team to your new town. That was a game changer for many.

I still love my old town, the river and the great lake. I still follow the Tigers but the Rays have always been #1 along with the Lightning and Bucs.

I hear you about the other countries as those that come here come for a reason.....the life.
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  #44  
Old 12-02-2013, 06:07 PM
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I don't care who people root for as long as they're not complete douches about it. I do think it's a shame that people don't adopt the new town they're in, at least as a second team, and you should let your kids decide whether they root for the home team or your old team (a little in family rivalry makes things more fun IMO). You should at least want the Lightning to do well enough to stick around so you can keep watching your Bruins when they come into town, so support hockey here in general, not just a couple nights a season. I wish people would be more open minded in that sense. If I ever move I will support my new town's team if they have one (except for teams I truly hate like the Panthers and Flyers, so a bit hypocritical, but cmon there's no serious reason to actually HATE the Lightning is there? ).

I don't particularly mind the Canadian crowds that come in as they tend to be fairly polite about supporting their teams, but Buffalo, Philly, Pittsburgh, etc. fans come off as totally insecure and harboring an inferiority complex with how shitty they act, and many are so obviously glory chasers and not true fans. Be proud of where you're from but realize your city is more than just its sports teams and stop using it as a cudgel to bash your neighbors in a place you chose to live. Tampa fans aren't totally innocent either, I've heard stories of drunk Rays fans picking on kids after games against the Yankees. So yeah.. I dunno.. I guess it's just an issue with people being assholes in general.

Last edited by Hoek; 12-02-2013 at 06:10 PM.
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  #45  
Old 12-02-2013, 06:48 PM
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Hmm. I just don't think I could move to Pittsburgh and put on an 87 sweater and feel good about much of anything. Being part of the community is overrated.
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  #46  
Old 12-02-2013, 10:41 PM
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http://www.yardbarker.com/nhl/articl..._goal/15211346

It's an idea. But we will need a lot more ushers.
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  #47  
Old 12-03-2013, 01:02 AM
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The ushers can have tasers. We're the lightning, it all makes sense.
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  #48  
Old 12-03-2013, 07:44 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Donnie D View Post
I have a real problem with people who want to be half residents. People move to a city for economic, for cultural, the weather, family, low taxes - a whole host of reasons. For whatever reason, they chose to live here.

If you live in a city, don't you have an obligation or responsibility to become a citizen of that community? Don't you want to read the newspaper where you live to know what is happening in your world, not the one where you used to live? Don't you want to vote for people on your city council rather than the commission where you used to live? Don't you want to be on the PTA where you kid goes to school instead of the school where you used to live? So why do you want to move to a city, leave your former city, become a citizen of your new town, but still hang on to the sporting teams from the place you used to live?

The worst are the folks who dress their kids up in their former home town's team colors. I'll confess, I did the same thing when I left Chicago. When my kids & I moved to Sarasota my kids were given the finest Bear's, White Sox and Bulls T-Shirts in town. It took me some time, but I realized that I wasn't being fair to my kids. They had the right to be proud of the city where they lived and fit in with their friends who were Tampa fans. I was really being selfish trying to make them live my childhood, cheering for teams from a city that they had no interest in or was ever home. So I stopped being a White Sox fan and became a Rays fan because I wanted my kids to be proud of the city where they lived. I grew up a Blackhawk fan, but when they play the Lightning, they are just another dirt bag team with a bunch of crappy fans that piss me off when they scream during the national anthem.

I don't get it. If your heart is still in Buffalo, shuffle off. Life's too short to live in a place when you truly want to live somewhere else. You can get a job there. You can shovel snow - lots of people do it.

I'm not telling you that you have to abandon your past. If Chicago is in the World Series against a team other than Tampa, I'm probably going to be cheering for Chicago.

But let's put it another way. If someone immigrates to this country and becomes an American citizen do you want them cheering for their former country or the USA? On St. Patrickís Day, itís ok to wear green and be proud that youíre Irish. But you damn well better not be rooting for Ireland against the United States in a soccer match.
Eh, to an extent. But I feel you are also allowed to be a fan of the team you want as well. I mean, I'm no longer in Tampa. Technically, my closest team is Pitt now (Columbus a short distance further). You can say I should integrate into the community as a Pitt fan, and I will fight you to the death on it (growing up Cleveland before Baltimore stole our team, no team was hated more than the Steelers on top of hating their fans and the Pen fans).

Just because I received a very good job offer which required me to move does not mean I have to change my allegiance to the teams I grew up cheering on. I do cheer on Columbus, but when I am at the game tonight, I will be in Lightning colors. Does that mean I'm a bad community member? I don't think so, it's a sport. Now, I also am not going to be starting "Lets Go Bolts" chants, or cussing out Blue Jacket fans and threatening them. Maybe some playful joking and laughing, but certainly not what other teams have done to me at games (mainly Pitt/Boston fans, who then run away when I stood up and gave it back to them).
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  #49  
Old 12-03-2013, 09:58 AM
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uf910 is right. We'll just have to put up with the phenomenon, forever; it's all part of being a destination locale. The zany carbophobic alarmist and level-headed alike know, when it comes to the climate for them to live in, unsurprisingly warmer is better, so here they come. Nobody in their right mind leaves Tampa Bay to go live in Ottawa or Buffalo, unless they're somehow forced to at gunpoint. We have what others wish they had, so as soon as they get the chance they leave their wonderful frigid industrial wasteland and their wonderful hockey team and come down here to what the rest of us already had figured out is the place to be, with the nice warm weather. But they remain sophisticated northerners--or even more sophisticated northeasterners--they got their wonderful "home team" jersey on eBay for $35 and sure ain't leaving it in the closet to cheer on some newfangled warm-weather team. That ain't real hockey! (Except for that big shiny silver thing...sorry, OTT & BUF jersey-clad real hockey fans)

Last edited by Top Shelf; 12-03-2013 at 10:00 AM.
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  #50  
Old 12-03-2013, 11:14 AM
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i don't care who people root for as long as they're not complete douches about it.
this!!!
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